8 Tips for Writing Lesson Plans

Lesson planning seems to be the bane of all teachers, especially at the start of the year. However, when it's done right you'll have a plan that will help you deliver the perfect lesson. Here's eight tips for making planning easier, and getting the most out of the time you have with your class.

  1. Use templates where possible

 

Templates are a great way to get a head start on your lesson planning. They're also perfect for making sure you include everything when you're creating your lesson. There's plenty of places online that have templates on offer, so play around with them and find one you like. If you create a lesson you really feel went well, save the plan. You can use it as a template for future classes.

 

“When writing lesson plans, sometimes using a template can help focus you on components of lessons you may have overlooked,” suggests Lily Jones, who taught K/1 for seven years in Northern California.

 

  1. List materials you will need

 

Once you've planned the lesson, work out what you'll need to help deliver it. It could be something like flash cards or educational games, or something that will need creating beforehand, like a power point presentation. Get them together with your plan beforehand, so you know you'll have them to hand when the time comes.

 

  1. Designate time for each section of your lesson

 

Each lesson should have different sections and activities, to keep students engaged and motivated. When you plan these activities in, remember to keep time constraints in mind. You don't want to plan lots of activities and then not have time to do them.

 

“Give each activity a definite deadline within your lesson to keep it flowing smoothly,” suggests Amber Coburn, tutor of Australian Assignment Help site.

 

  1. Attach any handouts or resources needed

 

On the same topic, make sure you attach any paper resources you'll need, like handouts, when you make your lesson plan. You'll have probably built the lesson around them, so it makes sense to keep them together. You can save them together in a folder on your hard drive for easy reference later.

 

  1. Remember to include state standards where needed

 

The state standards are what you should base your entire lesson on. They're the building blocks that you start with, and build your lesson around. Look into what the standards are for your particular lesson or subject, and start with them.

 

“Adapt your state standards depending on the needs and abilities of the students in your class,” says Gloria Kopp, an eLearning consultant from Studydemic.

 

  1. Choose the best delivery methods

 

Once you've decided what you're going to teach, you'll need to decide how you'll deliver that lesson. Will it work better as a power point presentation? As a group activity? As a game? The method you pick should make the information you give easier to take in.

 

“The method you choose will depend on the age and ability of your students,” says EDtech specialist Carol Wise of Boom Essays.

 

  1. Create clear objectives

 

To create a successful lesson plan, you need to have clear objectives that your students can follow. Use active verbs in your plan that clearly define what your students should be able to do by the end of the class.

 

“Using active objectives means that your students will be able to do something that they couldn't before the lesson,” says online tutor Mary Walton from Simple Grad.

 

  1. Attach any handouts or resources needed

 

On the same topic, make sure you attach any paper resources you'll need, like handouts, when you make your lesson plan. You'll have probably built the lesson around them, so it makes sense to keep them together. You can save them together in a folder on your hard drive for easy reference later.

 

  1. Decide how you will evaluate progress

 

You'll also need to know how you'll measure your students' progress. Will they need to create something you can evaluate, or will you do so a different way?

 

Try these tips out and you'll find lesson planning much easier, and more effective, than ever before.

 

Source: teach.com